2011 William Larue Weller Barrel Proof Release 133.5 Proof (66.75%)  Bourbon Whiskey (750ml)

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2011 William Larue Weller Barrel Proof Release 133.5 Proof (66.75%) Bourbon Whiskey (750ml)

Kentucky, UNITED STATES
$299.00 Bottle
  • ABV 66.75%

Awarded: 'Second Finest Whisky in the World' - Jim Murray's Whisky Bible 2013

William Larue Weller is the Antique Collection’s uncut, unfiltered, wheated recipe bourbon. The 133.5 Proof was birthed from 2011, distilled in the Fall of 1998 as reviewed and awarded by Jim Murray.

On an interesting side note, the Antique Collection have also been the focal point of a whisky mystery: the phenomena of alcohol increase during barrel ageing. It's a fact that whiskies like George T. Stagg generally come out at a higher barrel proof than what they were initially bottled at. As to why the proof would go up, instead of down, has generated several theories. Some say that it has a lot to do with temperature and location in the rickhouse (high or low). Barrels at the top of a rickhouse could have a higher proof because the atmosphere is supersaturated with alcohol molecules and they are as likely to enter as to leave (Letting more water escape and less likely to be replenished). The obvious problem with this is that most rickhouses are fairly well circulated. Apparently, it comes down to the difference in wicking rates between alcohol and water in wood and water concentration in the atmosphere (humidity). Since the oak barrel is considered to be a membrane, what migrates across the membrane is a function of the conditions on both sides. If the atmosphere, temperature, and pressure outside the barrel was exactly the same as the inside, there would be no migration across the membrane.

Other Reviews...(97.5 points) - (n24) like last year, oak springs eternal from the nose. This time, though perhaps not quite so startling as the previous bottling, (t24) the delivery suggests i am wrong, dammit! Not only big oak, but a little oil plugging the gaps. Hang on: a chink of light. Here come those sugars. They are not heavy molasses but much brighter muscovado and Demerara, which makes inroads into concentrated liquorice; (f25) rilliant! A whiskey which has relaxed entirely, gives you massive oak to chew without the splinters as it is beautifully accompanied by not only the usual mocha but extra, sharply oiled, Venezualen cocoa beans and the liquorice, light hickory and dark sugars in complete and total harmony: Like the Bee Gees, but without the teeth...; (b24.5) wow! This is becoming a must experience whiskey for hard-core Bourbon lovers. Well, whisk(e)y lovers period, really! A bourbon which absolutely takes you to the wire with a "will it or won't it" type brinkmanship taking the flavours as far as they will go in an okay direction without veering off the road and crashing down the Cliffside. Majestic. Or, as it's American, perhaps i should say Presidential...67.4% (133.5 Proof) - Jim Murray's Whiksy Bible 2013